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dc.contributor.authorWakefield, Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.authorStone, Emma L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Garethen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-30T06:58:30Z
dc.date.available2018-10-30T06:58:30Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.otherHPU4160299en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://lib.pyu.edu.vn/handle/123456789/1817
dc.description.abstractThe light-emitting diode (LED) street light market is expanding globally, and it is important to understand how LED lights affect wildlife populations. We compared evasive flight responses of moths to bat echolocation calls experimentally under LED-lit and -unlit conditions. Significantly, fewer moths performed ‘powerdive’ flight manoeuvres in response to bat calls (feeding buzz sequences from Nyctalusspp.) under an LED street light than in the dark. LED street lights reduce the anti-predator behaviour of moths, shifting the balance in favour of their predators, aerial hawking bats.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe Royal Societyen_US
dc.subjectBiologyen_US
dc.subjectBehaviouren_US
dc.subjectEcologyen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental scienceen_US
dc.subjectArtificial lightingen_US
dc.subjectBatsen_US
dc.titleLight-emitting diode street lights reduce last-ditch evasivemanoeuvres by moths to bat echolocation callsen_US
dc.typeBooken_US
dc.size458KBen_US
dc.departmentEducationen_US


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