Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorOlson, Randal S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHaley, Patrick B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDyer, Fred C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-30T07:09:14Z
dc.date.available2018-10-30T07:09:14Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.otherHPU4160271en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://lib.pyu.edu.vn/handle/123456789/2170
dc.description.abstractEven though grouping behaviour has been actively studied for over a century, the relative importance of the numerous proposed fitness benefits of grouping remain unclear. We use a digital model of evolving prey under simulated predation to directly explore the evolution of gregarious foraging behaviour according to one such benefit, the ‘many eyes’ hypothesis. According to this hypothesis, collective vigilance allows prey in large groups to detect predators more efficiently by making alarm signals or behavioural cues to each other, thereby allowing individuals within the group to spend more time foraging.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe Royal Societyen_US
dc.subjectBiologyen_US
dc.subjectComputational biologyen_US
dc.subjectBehaviouren_US
dc.subjectEvolutionen_US
dc.subjectGroup foragingen_US
dc.subjectGenetic relatednessen_US
dc.subjectReproductive strategyen_US
dc.titleExploring the evolution of a trade off between vigilance and foraging in group living organismsen_US
dc.typeBooken_US
dc.size548KBen_US
dc.departmentEducationen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record